Real College Matters

Beyond AP and IB: What makes an education "good?"

September 24, 2020 Leigh Moore and Ryan Perry; Tracie Catlett Season 1 Episode 9
Real College Matters
Beyond AP and IB: What makes an education "good?"
Chapters
Real College Matters
Beyond AP and IB: What makes an education "good?"
Sep 24, 2020 Season 1 Episode 9
Leigh Moore and Ryan Perry; Tracie Catlett

As the saying goes, the main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing. Too often, we talk about achievement instead of education, knowledge instead of understanding, accomplishments instead of learning.
 
Many thanks to Tracie Catlett, Head of School at Greensboro Day School (NC), for joining us as we tackle tough questions:  what Is a quality education?  What markers of a secondary curriculum are most meaningful?  Tracie's professional experiences, which include math teacher, academic dean, admissions director and head of school, equip her with a valuable perspective for the discussion.

Note: The provided transcript has not been edited for accuracy. 

More about Greensboro Day School
More about Real College Matters

Show Notes Transcript

As the saying goes, the main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing. Too often, we talk about achievement instead of education, knowledge instead of understanding, accomplishments instead of learning.
 
Many thanks to Tracie Catlett, Head of School at Greensboro Day School (NC), for joining us as we tackle tough questions:  what Is a quality education?  What markers of a secondary curriculum are most meaningful?  Tracie's professional experiences, which include math teacher, academic dean, admissions director and head of school, equip her with a valuable perspective for the discussion.

Note: The provided transcript has not been edited for accuracy. 

More about Greensboro Day School
More about Real College Matters

Leigh Moore :

Welcome to The Real College matters podcast. This is Leigh Moore. I'm a college advisor in Louisville, Kentucky, and I'm joined today by co host Ryan Perry from Los Angeles. How's it going, Ryan? are greatly happy to be here. Thank you. You're busy, busy time for you in life in general. And Ryan's an essay coach as well for us and his think had a lot of essay topics floating in front of them. We welcome everybody to the podcast. For those of you who are regular listeners, you know that we try on each episode to cover a topic that is relevant to college admissions, but not necessarily discussed very much kind of niche topics in college admissions. And today we're going to talk about curriculum. curricula. I guess we hear a lot about achievement in APS. And, you know, all of those markers on a transcript, I suppose. But I'm really fascinated by the concept of education versus achievement, I guess, and what makes somebody a lifelong learner and so on. Ryan and I are both very excited to welcome our guests today because we both have a long standing relationship with this person. She is Tracy Catlett, and Tracy is the Head of School at Greensboro Day School in Greensboro, North Carolina. Tracy, welcome to the show.

Tracie Catlett :

Thank you. Glad to be here.

Leigh Moore :

Well, we're we're glad to have you and I try to you know, dispense with big long introductions. And I. But I do have to say I think the way I would introduce you, Tracie is you are the person probably more than anybody else that I know who has completely given their life over to education. Tracy is the Head of School at Greensburg day school. She's This is your second year, correct? Correct? Yep. Great. Prior to that, she was at Louisville Collegiate School for Gosh, 10 years or so? Yeah,

Unknown Speaker :

they're 13.

Leigh Moore :

And, okay, they're 13. She was in the Jefferson County, Kentucky public school system prior to that. And on a personal note, Tracy and I go way back to Days of playing bunco before our kids were born. And but Tracy, what I was thinking about prior to the show is that my first cognizance of you really being a serious educator was what was the name of the certification that you got as a math teacher?

Tracie Catlett :

Oh, National Board Certification.

Leigh Moore :

I mean, it was like the first person in Kentucky to get that it was me. I remember thinking, you know, gosh, she is really, really serious about education.

Tracie Catlett :

I was I think I was part of a consortium that might have been the first group of math teachers. But what I remember most about that was it required a six hour test, they revamped it ever since. But I had to take a six hour examination when I was eight months pregnant, so I'll never that. That is the part of it will remain in my mind forever.

Leigh Moore :

Just just a wonderful, wonderfully comfortable experience, I'm sure. Well, you know, when I knew that you were being considered for Head of School I was thinking through I actually, I think I was listening to the enrollment spectrum podcast. And there was a discussion about, you know, what makes for a top shelf Head of School, and they were everything. They were describing all these characteristics and life experiences that are ideal in a head of school. And the funny thing I remember them saying was that the search for a Head of School generally is looking for God on a good day. So somebody who could, you know, absolutely fix everybody's problems, but what I remember distinctly as it relates to you is the positions and the experiences. I was like, as Tracy Catlett has all of those because just going backwards at collegiate you were admissions. Tell me, tell us all the posts you held it collegiate.

Tracie Catlett :

Sure. Um, well, my first love was teaching math. And so I taught math for for a number of years served as the math department chair, the Dean of academics, assistant Head of School for Academic Affairs, and then moved over My associate Head of School roll to director of admission, which was it was fun it was it was. It was all it was all it was a natural fit. It was all about telling the story of the school. I had experienced it and lived it now I get to tell stories to complete strangers about about the school, which was fun.

Leigh Moore :

We you know, we don't usually talk a whole lot about our own educational experiences. But that is where Ryan where you knew, Mrs. Mrs. Catlett as you call her, right?

Ryan Perry :

Yes, it is. So, yeah, she was our calculus teacher, resident Florida State fan. And I'm in I mean, it's the most complimentary way possible. I my locker is on the third floor, and Mrs. catlins classroom is on the third floor. And she's kind of also like the floor mom, the person who would kindly remind you to tuck your shirt in, but also make sure that she asked when we had tests if everybody was doing well. So yes, it was awesome. overlapping with this Caleta collegiate.

Unknown Speaker :

And I depended on this students in the hallway because they very often would walk my own children to their kindergarten or first grade class. And Ryan may have had a part of that too. Yes. Yeah, it was. You always felt a little a little special when you had the opportunity to walk Jack or Will to class.

Leigh Moore :

Well, you know, that's, that's really cool. I love connections, especially when people find their way back to each other for things like this over the years. So Tracie curriculum, I mean, for it's not for obvious reasons, I thought that there would be nobody better to weigh in on high school curriculum. Do you think so? I think maybe I oversimplify things. When I say, yeah, excuse me. It seems like we don't talk about education. We just talked about achievement. But I honestly, as a parent and a counselor, I don't hear a whole lot about what constitutes a strong educational background for somebody. Mm hmm. Do you? I mean, do you think I'm off base on that?

Unknown Speaker :

Now, it's very important. It's about you know, it serves as a foundation and the preparation. And it's a very important process of the education experience and in the college application experience.

Leigh Moore :

So, you know, you have talked about, I think I've mentioned to you that I've read a little bit about the what the writer Wendell Berry says about universities, and he says that every university should ask itself all the time. What are we building? And is it good? And I think that at its core, I think every organization can ask itself that whether it's even, you know, family, or whatever, can ask itself that, and I think, you know, what are we building is probably a pretty, pretty central question around which a curriculum is developed. When you think of, I'm sure that you're concerned also with, you know, a character curriculum. But if you're thinking strictly academics, I mean, what are the most important components of a strong curriculum?

Tracie Catlett :

Well, I think the outcome of a strong academic curriculum is that schools that do it right, are producing lifelong learners. And I think to do that you need, you know, several components. So I think an academic curriculum, first of all is aligned, you know, pedagogy is aligned, developmentally speaking, what you what you plan in terms of curriculum for a five year old looks much different than a 14 year old. But there's some ways that there are similarities. You know, you might be implementing a writing workshop and one grade, so you have to ask yourself, how does that? How does that get the? How does that get the students ready for the next level? So So alignment comes in many shapes and sizes. But that's, that's one important characteristic of a strong academic programming. And then I think the curriculum itself, I think, I'm on I think there's really some content, right, there's always the content piece, but then there's a skills piece, a competency piece, and then a connection piece. I think, in terms of connection, you know, when I taught AP calculus, maybe that didn't connect with all my students in terms of interest, but I always tried to find a way as a teacher to connect with students. Regardless whether it's talking to Ryan about the soccer game or talking to another student about their role in you know, in their their community service and giving back to the community or, or trying to relate what we do in calculus to some of the things that the students You know, what they can relate to in terms of their interests. So I think connection is a huge part of that. And then frankly, the thing that we don't talk about a lot of is it is interesting, you know, and some of that's related to connection. But how can we make it interesting, and I don't mean the bells and whistles and fluff. But at the end of the day, even as adults, we choose to listen and participate in things in our life now, out of interest, you know, it's really hard to engage adults, and things that are interesting. So why should we expect the same from the kids? Um, anyway, going back to the content skills and competency? I think a strong academic curriculum has, you know, includes all of those components. Ryan,

Leigh Moore :

tell the listeners what what was it you said, I thought you gave Mrs. Catlett a great compliment about what you remember about her as a teacher.

Unknown Speaker :

Yeah, I mean, I think that the best teachers kind of help you understand not only the topic in class that day or the semester curriculum as a whole, but I think they understand what help you understand why you need to care, and why it's going to be important for you, you know, Miss Callen, I can joke about the use of derivatives. But there's such a profound impact that building confidence does for you when you learn something that you think is difficult, especially when there's kind of layers of self doubt. And I think the one of the best things that Mrs. Cavalia did, for certainly me, but I've heard plenty of other of my classmates say the same thing is just make it to make a learning environment where you're comfortable getting it wrong, but also where you feel like with one day's work, and then two days work, and so on, you can actually conquer something that you didn't think that you could. And so overall, I think Mrs. Keller was such a great example. And many of the teachers that were her colleagues and collegiate as well, were such a great example of how kind of digging in and being willing to listen and understand and also try things made it such a healthy learning environment. That's why it's as for someone who didn't naturally love math, I really enjoyed kind of working with Mrs. kotla. Because it made me feel like I can do this, this is interesting, I understand why I need it. And kind of treating someone like an adult, makes them feel like they should treat themselves and the working for them, like an adult, and a professional as well.

Leigh Moore :

Thanks for that. Tracy. Um, you know, if I studied, one of my majors was secondary education. I don't remember ever studying curricula for the elements of a strong curriculum, maybe we did, you know, 35 years ago. But I've certainly picked up quite a bit along the way as I've been gotten back into education. Do you have any rules of thumb that you, I mean, when I'm working with a student, and obviously, as an independent counselor, I try to only advise on curricular choices when and when somebody at school has, you know, is not at their school is not able to weigh in, usually, the school knows a lot better about how they do things than I do. But what are the rules of thumb for a student? Well, first of all, let me tell me this, do you think that a lot of people are out there very interested in their students going to highly selective college? Do you think it's reasonable to project which ninth graders are going to be on that track? Or do you think that it's too early to tell? And maybe they're still going to make some academic leaps and bounds?

Unknown Speaker :

I think I definitely agree that you can look at the accomplishments and successes of current ninth graders and make projections that's, you know, the best predictor of future success is current performance. So I definitely think we could do that. But I, I wouldn't just do that. I think they're, the brain is constantly developing into you know, kids are forging new interest students. I think even as adults we are, so we definitely shouldn't discount the fact that kids in ninth grade look completely different four years later. I know that I've worked with a lot of students and still do hoo, hoo, they're just different kids after their experience. They take one class and all of a sudden, something's lit a fire and they're, they're passionate about an experience that they had or or a teacher has pushed them. Just a little bit harder to consider, you know, taking that AP class or the IB class or to do a class. In, in, and they did and you know, they're they either their interest has changed, their focus has changed or it's just made them. It's just contributed to their toolset, be a lifelong learner.

Leigh Moore :

And yeah, I guess I asked the question in the context of, you know, thinking of parents who are whose kids are starting High School and you know, sometimes there is that sense that Oh gosh, my our kids already been put on a track. And how do we stop that train? Or get them on a faster win? But you know, so that's interesting to me. What? What's the I don't think you've never taught in an IB school? Correct. Kevin Johnson Advanced Placement of schools, and you've taught a few AP classes along the way, I believe. calc and GGG, A, B, and BC,

Tracie Catlett :

I taught AP, the A B, the fabulous sequence. Okay, good.

Leigh Moore :

Do you have rules of so for people who are I think this is kind of an interesting concept for people whose kids are aspiring, or they think they will aspire to go to a highly selective college. I think in terms of rules of thumb, you know, in terms of what colleges, what colleges seem to look for sometimes. One thing I hear a lot is the student who says they're going to major in engineering. But hasn't, you know, hasn't even approximated the bounds of the high schools math curriculum. In again, you know, everything's different. But do you think of, do you have any rules of thumb when you think about AP curriculum? curriculum? In terms of like, that's always going to be a great course? Or that's always a tough course? Or do you all have it? Oh, let me ask you this. So we haven't talked about GD at GDS. Does your school does greensquare day school have any rules or parameters surrounding APS? Like, how many a student can take or how soon?

Unknown Speaker :

Yeah, I think we, we look at it a case by case some of the some of the courses do just naturally have prerequisites. And then, and then some of them do not. And then in terms, of course, load it really is, again, case by case, we don't want our kids over extended, just for the sake of a profile, we want them taking classes that they're interested in that they're good at what they want to be challenged. So So finding the right striking the right balance with the with the challenge, but also having a life as a kid is really important and always a part of the conversation. I think in AP courses, as good as its teacher, I'm going to anyone can go online and pull an AP curriculum. But if you don't have a teacher that, you know, takes that curriculum and helps you develop the content skills, competency connection, and makes it interesting, then, you know, it's only really as good as its teacher. And, you know, there's some, there's some pros and cons in my mind. You some AP courses can really restrict teachers on what they can do based on the curriculum outline, they, some teachers, at times are fearful for going outside of that, you know, thinking about doing this project, because they've got this to cover. So in some ways, it can be very restrictive. You know, in some ways, you know, I see a lot of schools and even my own son who got lots of credit at college, because of, you know, taking the classes. I mean that that was nice. So what it allowed him to do is in college, take some more electives in an area that he really enjoys, because he got some credits, you know, from his high school day. So, it there's definitely pros and cons, I think, through the AP program and the AP classes.

Leigh Moore :

For sure, yeah, I mean, I certainly hear a whole lot of claims that you know, something is just being taught to the test. And, you know, you mentioned online learning. I'm not sure if you notice we are in a weird situation right now. We're in quarantine. quaza, quarantine and lockdown. What could you talk a little bit about? Well, first of all, okay, you're going to go off topic a little bit. I'm sorry, Your Head of School. And six months ago, I guess a little bit over six months ago, this thing hit with a force. So you were in your first year as Head of School. Was there one moment that was the pit of your stomach moment when you realize this is really big? Ah, I mean, because I just I just know the weight of having so many kids well, being interesting to you must be really kind of scary and not knowing what to talk us through that.

Unknown Speaker :

Yeah. Well, the big lightbulb moment, I happen to be in Philadelphia. And I think it was the end of February, with the National Association of Independent Schools conference. You know, doing a lot of conversations with friends and colleagues and just other heads through networking. And it was the talk of it was the focus of the conference, it just quickly became the focus, and we had pop up sessions, you know, and just listening to other people were thinking about zoom, and, you know, just not realizing how big this thing was going to get. But when we think back on it, you know, I pulled the team together, when I got back, we spent two full weekends together, you know, making the decision to get off campus in, in pivot to distance learning. When I look at the last six months, that was the easiest thing, it really was it, we even had our faculty go off campus, you know, and we just thought, okay, let's get through the next couple months, we had no idea in the longevity of this, the hardest thing in this, this last six months would be the putting the pieces together the safety precautions and the infrastructure, so that we could reopen this fall. And we have, but of course, as much time and preparation that went into reopening, such as the new air filtration system and setting up outdoor classrooms, you know, we we the where we wear face masks inside, regardless of our distance from each other. All of the work that went into putting us back together, you still have that gut wrenching feeling as a Head of School is everyone going to, you know, remain safe and healthy. And so just had to trust the plan. And the experts, we put together a Medical Advisory Board with our fantastic parents are doctors. We have a health center, or the director or a director of health services, incredible technology team ready to pivot, do some research but ready to go. And obviously a faculty that trusted the plan, and an admin team who was willing and ready just to serve at any moment. And you know, while we all took some travel this summer, we didn't really vacation. I mean, that was it was just that going back, and I did experience incredible anxiety. The night before our students came back, I mean, it's just when you really think about the well being of a community. It is, you know, a lot of sleep a lot of sleepless nights.

Leigh Moore :

Tracy, how are the teachers doing?

Unknown Speaker :

It, our teachers have really been amazing, just embraced everything, you know, we were able to open back up because with an increased enrollment, because we focused on making sure every family had a choice, they could choose high distance learning, or they could choose in person learning, and a lot of schools have done that. But of course, managing that is much harder. So our teachers are managing in person. Students, they're managing students doing remote learning. And they really are never off. You know, they're always making sure in between classes or on their breaks that kids are socially distanced. They're humans, you know, the human behavior. It's not natural, what we're asking our students to do, you know, stand six feet apart. Our teachers are just always on, you know, they're, they're cleaning death between

Leigh Moore :

me. And when I asked how they were doing, I was kind of thinking like, how are they doing?

Unknown Speaker :

I mean, I can't imagine how struck me Yeah, they're, they're very stressed. They want to be here. They want to be around their students. But it's just, it's hard. It feel you know, we're in September right now, and it feels like December to them. So we've actually just added more time off, frankly, for our for our faculty, because it was put in some cleaning days and professional days, but we just really, but we've got an iterative process going I'm always asking for their feedback for teachers, feedback, students feedback, we're actually evaluating it every week. It doesn't go in a black hole. And then we're making, we're chipping away. So and I'm sharing the feedback. I'm sharing it with the faculty. I'm letting them know what we can do. I'm being very transparent. But we can't do this, you know, we can't solve this. So we just a constant connection and constant dialogue is really helping our faculty and staff, you know, the hard times. For sure.

Leigh Moore :

Ryan, what questions are on your mind?

Unknown Speaker :

Well, one of the things that we briefly discussed ahead of our conversation, and I would love to hear you kind of expand upon is balancing kind of the rigorous question. Load the rigorous curriculum with still fostering and, and cultivating kind of the desire to learn for learning sake. I think that, in my experience with Mrs. callate, we were at a tough school full of a lot of smart kids, all of whom wanted to go on and go to good colleges and universities, but recognize that we needed to take hard classes in order to do that. And one of the things that I personally remember about being a high schooler is how you really have to walk the fine line between wanting to get good grades, because of those grades impact on your future, versus learning to learn and enjoy your classes and actually grow your knowledge base, which in turn actually leads to those good grades. So I was just curious as in your new role, and as a Head of School previously, what you kind of had to say about that and the student experience at GDS? Yeah, well, it's a great question. It's, you know, it's a, I think it's a problem that no one's really solved yet is, is how do you know kids need to be challenged, that's important, but but it can't be to the point where there's toxic stress, you know, we they need to be appropriately challenged, so that they are well positioned to take the next step for any college highly selective or not highly selected, whatever is the best fit for them. So how do we do that? I'd say one, one solution is, is the schedule, you know, using time as a resource, so so we let it I let a big schedule change at my former school at collegiate. And then we are our dean of academics here at Greensboro day school, in a large group of teachers, proposed a new schedule change course, that was for 2021. But with COVID, we immediately decided, hey, we're gonna, we're gonna just do it, because it's just better for kids. So we, you know, we take a very what feels like a Industrial Revolution type schedule of bells and seven periods in 45 minutes, and stretch it into eight periods over two days, and our kids have 15 minutes between classes. I mean, you know, they feel like young adults, you know, they've got some independent time and, and then it's just using the schedule to be more conducive to on campus studying and not taking it all at home, they still have homework. But now they not only have time to study on campus and do homework, but they've got time to connect with our teachers, they've got fine to work in with their, with their peers on the project. So I think one way to do that, Ryan, is to think about how the what the day looks like the structure of the day, so that we can give the kids the tools to be successful with a rigorous course load. And then, you know, just keeping the love of learning alive by really encouraging kids to choose courses that they that they have an interest in and, or curiosity, I mean, they just don't have it figured out. Most college kids don't have it figured out yet. So just still allowing that freedom when when when schools set graduation requirements, how can it be set so that it is preparing them for college, but also giving them the freedom to take things that they enjoy? In or, again, like I said, have a curiosity enter it just an interest in because I do think that does expand there expands their, their knowledge and their experiences. And that's what's preparing them ultimately, college and for life beyond college.

Leigh Moore :

Just this morning in this On a related note, just this morning, in inside higher ed there, I read a piece that was written by a kiddo who is currently a freshman at Yale. And he talked about I think it was called tortured by acceptance. And he talked about the past year getting in everywhere. And it was really painful to read, but I was glad he wrote it, because what he kind of laid out was it was never going to be enough. You know, he got into Princeton, and then it was all about, you know, he didn't like the enjoyment of the successes was more and more fleeting. And basically, kind of boil it and he realized I've done you know, I've not been doing anything for myself here. I don't even know what I want. You know, and it was I'm very honest. article and I think that what Ryan's asking you about is so you know, at the end of the day, life hasn't even really happened to these kids yet. And you know, and I think I think increasing with sorry, sound old but I think every year I think education is more and more about beauty and recognizing it and appreciating it and you know, and to your point, that connectedness of everything but, you know, I think If you have a love of learning, then I think it's definitely easier to come to terms with the fact that like your college may or may not be the perfect college atmosphere that you thought you were seeking. And, you know, it scares me a little bit to see kids just stacking up numbers of APS, for the sake of having 14 APS, you know. But I mean, not to say that they're not developing a love of learning. But yeah, I just think achievement can kind of overshadow the ideal of learning sometimes. Mm hmm. Did I read that your spouse is teaching at GDS? as well? Yeah. Yeah. say there's somebody with a serious liberal arts education. And yeah, so Tracy's husband, Marcus, he, what kind of what class class or classes is he teaching?

Unknown Speaker :

He's teaching a civics course, and AP economics. And then he's teaching is a health and wellness and then a personal fitness.

Leigh Moore :

Very good. And so yeah, they're keeping him pretty busy. Hmm. I think of you know, Mark is I knew him for years is just, you know, the coach of a huge football team. And it doesn't take very long in conversation with Mark before you figure out that, yeah, he's a he was a great football coach. But there's a whole lot there. In terms of appreciating learning to as a parent, Tracy, when you think about learning, and so Tracy has four sons. And who are let's see how old is oldest now?

Unknown Speaker :

JOHN? JOHN is 24.

Leigh Moore :

So you got 24? down to what, like 1314?

Unknown Speaker :

Yeah, yep. 24, all the way down to 14 to Sunday.

Leigh Moore :

Okay, and so, as a, I don't think we can be parents without having without being changed as educators? What have you seen or learned through the boys that has impacted you most? In your views as an educator?

Unknown Speaker :

Yeah, the mom perspective, I think has shaped has shaped me as an educator and as a leader, definitely, I think about, you know, watching my kids come home, and we all ask our kids, I'm sure when they get in the car, get home, how was your day? who your favorite teachers who are your favorite classes, if you you know, it was an interesting experience for me, because I'm asking them about their classes, and teachers, also in a place that I work. So I know them as colleagues, and I know them is, as my children's teachers, and, you know, kids get it. And if you ask them who their favorite teachers are, or who, you know, who impacted them the most, it's probably going to be a teacher that held them accountable. But one that did so in probably a loving way, and made the time to try to connect with the kids. You know, being content experts is important, obviously, for the, for the program, but the connection piece is more important. Our kids want to learn for kids, our kids want to learn and really perform well for the teachers who they respect and connect. So just that whole, really hearing my kids talk about why someone was their favorite teacher, or why it was a favorite class and me listening to them and really understanding, honestly, with all four kids, and they're also very different. It really, it you know, it was obviously about interested in a subject, but it was it all came down to pretty much the teacher and the connection that the teacher was able to do either through the curriculum or just through the personal connections in the classroom. And then I would say, the second biggest takeaway was, you know, particularly as my kids got into the middle school age, as, as they did homework, it really because I watched them and they weren't doing it because, you know, always that they just love the subject. They, they It was a checklist, you know, and they got out their homework need to do this need to do that. And it just became it felt like a rote experience every night. What's the checklist, um, you know, when we moved into a, you know, an extended period schedule, like I mentioned earlier, the four periods over two days and, you know, it was different they were it was a sort of a less is more concept they were spending every night just on a couple subjects, but they were going deeper with it. It was really fun to see that transformation and have an impact and how we could use time in the schedule to to kind of transform You know, how kids approach learning and how kids approach homework? So it wasn't just something they checked off, they actually had to go a little deeper.

Leigh Moore :

Yeah, I think something that's a common thread. And what we're all saying is just that the transactional part of education is not necessarily great. You're really wanting to shoot for the transformational elements. And yet, you know, obviously, we live in a world that needs to quantify success, and I mean, your sound grades and things like that. Do you? Is there anything I haven't asked you about greens? I've never going to visit GDS sometime soon. But is there anything I haven't asked you about greens per day school?

Unknown Speaker :

Let me know when you're here. I can't wait. Yeah, well, we. Yeah, I'd

Leigh Moore :

love to visit some time. We're about out of time. Ryan, what have I left out?

Unknown Speaker :

nothing other than just a heartfelt thank you. It's so awesome to have a skeleton on and be able to circle back after this time and get her insight on the world of Secondary Education.

Leigh Moore :

Yeah, Tracy, I mean, I do think about the time that I mean, I know you were in banking, right. Yeah. And I think of your decision to go into education and the trickle down effect. I mean, how many people you've impacted already and you are a young person still you better be because remember, I am so if anything next on the horizon. And I think you're working on a degree

Unknown Speaker :

m&a and yeah, I'm in a doctorate program at Johns Hopkins and I'm really sticking with it when this when this pandemic came, I really thought What am I doing I you know, I'm I'm head of school here at Greensboro day school, love my job, love Greensburg do school. But what keeps me in it is, you know, my, my major is not about leadership. It's mind brain and teaching. So I'm the neuro science and cognitive development is as a leader of an educational institution. I think, being equipped with that knowledge to be able to, you know, lead teachers is really it's fascinating. So I'm learning as long as it's still fun for me to learn. I'm gonna stick with it. We'll see how far I can get how long this pandemic last, but it is fun. And yeah, I love GDS. And I really feel like I'm right where I'm supposed to be. And really, I will keep doing this as long as I enjoyed the work.

Leigh Moore :

Well, we all miss you in Louisville, and I am happy for Greensboro that they that they have you there but gonna have to let us know when you're going to be in town.

Unknown Speaker :

Now we'll do come visit Ryan and Lee. Thanks for having me really enjoyed talking with you all.

Leigh Moore :

Thanks so much. And thanks to your school for loaning, loaning you to us for an hour. Thanks a bunch. Thank you for listening to the real college matters podcast. Real coverage matters is a champion of high schools, high schoolers and high school educators. Our next episode will tackle a very different realm of Secondary Education, boarding schools, they are still a thing and we are going to have a wonderful panel of boarding school experts to debunk lots of myths and even prove that not all boarding schools are in New England, and it's a busy season for college applicants for sure. If you're your student need help with the college list or maybe even just some focus support on application essays. Get to know our network of fun and energetic advisors go to real college matters calm and get one of these scheduling appointment buttons and sign up for a free consultation to learn how we work and how we can help you on the journey to college.